James McMurtry comes to town

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James McMurtry's new album CHILDISH THINGS arrives in stores on September 6, featuring the controversial “we can’t make it here”.  He'll be appearing to support the album on Tuesday, Oct. 18 at  Uncle Peasant’s in Louisville

In 2003, James McMurtry joined forces with Houston’s Compadre Records and released the universally praised Live in Aught-Three. This summer finds McMurtry back with his first studio album in more three years, Childish Things, due out September 6 on Compadre Records.
 
The new album features ten new McMurtry-penned tunes as well as covers of Peter Case’s “The Old Part of Town” and the country standard “Ole Slew Foot.”
 
While Childish Things isn’t an overtly political record, the centerpiece has to be “We Can’t Make It Here,” McMurtry’s commentary on the current state of the union. “I've always been a little put off by activists. So you know it's a dire situation when I have to become one myself,” he explains. McMurtry made the song available as a free download on his website during the 2004 election. The response to the track was immediate and overwhelming and the song continues to be one of the most requested on stations across the country. Stephen King described the song as “stark and wrenchingly direct, this may be the best American protest song since (Bob Dylan’s) ‘Masters of War.’” Childish Things marks the first time the track will be available on disc without FCC-sensitive words censored.
 
Author Stephen King describes Ft. Worth native McMurtry as “the truest, fiercest songwriter of his generation.” The son of acclaimed author Larry McMurtry (Lonesome Dove, Terms of Endearment), James grew up on a steady diet of Johnny Cash and Roy Acuff records. His first album, released in 1989, was produced by John Mellencamp and marked the beginning of a series of critically acclaimed projects for Columbia and Sugar Hill.
 
In 2003, McMurtry released Live in Aught-Three, which became one of the most acclaimed live rock albums in decades. Entertainment Weekly noted, “His erudite guitar work fills out the melody, and there's plenty of excitement in his densely withering portraits and wry asides” while the hometown Austin Chronicle raved, “Like McMurtry's lyrics, this is no-frills, freak-flag rock. Turn it up.”
 
McMurtry will tour the U.S. for the remainder of 2005 and into next year in support of the album. He will appear at the nationally-televised Farm Aid concert in September.
 
Call Uncle Pleasant's at (502) 634-4147 for ticket information.

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