Kentucky's Cybercrimes Unit busts British sailor, state closer to winning War of 1812 [News]

Print

From a press release Kentucky's Attorney General's office distributed this afternoon:

An undercover investigation by Attorney General Jack Conway's Cybercrimes Unit has identified a British Royal Navy sailor stationed aboard an oil rig in the Persian Gulf as a suspected child pornographer. After further investigation by the Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS), with support from the FBI, Andrew Lomax was removed from the Al-Basrah Oil Terminal (ABOT) in Iraq territorial water and turned over to the Royal Navy Police. Evidence gathered by the Attorney General's office and other investigative agencies has been turned over to the Royal Navy Police for investigation.

Over a three-month period beginning in July 2010, an investigator in General Conway's Cybercrimes Unit identified the Internet Protocol (IP) address of a computer aboard the ABOT that possessed suspected child pornography. Using information collected by the Cybercrimes Unit, NCIS was able to link Lomax's computer to the suspected child pornographic images.

This bust of a British sailor should be a major boon to Kentucky's efforts in the War of 1812. Conway's Cybercrimes Unit's—not to be confused with "the Office of the Attorney General's Cybercrimes Unit" or "the Commonwealth of Kentucky's Cybercrimes Unit," as Conway must fund this merry band of pedophile policement with his own deep pockets—deserves all the credit a Friday afternoon press release will bestow upon it.

It's great that a kiddie-porn fan is off the streets rig. But if anyone can explain how Kentucky taxpayers benefited from state employes spending three months (!!!) trying to bust a British sailor based in the Persian Gulf, please do so in the comments.

My theory? It's an election year and Conway thought Kentucky voters would be impressed that he's worked with CBS's hit show NCIS. Clearly he doesn't think too highly of us:

Of course, maybe next week the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Service will share with taxpayers what it's doing to combat scurvy.

Photo: Courtesy Wikimedia