The Louisville Palace Wedding Show will turn your wedding up to 11

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The Louisville Palace Wedding Show will turn your wedding up to 11

Wedding season is approaching, the time where brides and grooms shuffle to and fro through every wedding show in Louisville as they dream up their perfect dream of wedded bliss at the altar. After a while, however, the shows seem to blend together into a morass of white buttercream frosting in gold luster dust with pearl white sugar beads floating on top, and they’re the plastic couples unable to lift their feet out of the sticky sameness of it all.

What’s a modern couple looking for a break from the traditional to do? Allow producer Sydney O’Bryan and co-producers Ryan Armbrust and Brittany Murphy to lead the way to a new gold dawn of wedding shows in Louisville, the rays of light beaming down upon The Louisville Palace for the first-ever Louisville Palace Wedding Show this Friday from 6 to 11 p.m., sponsored by Louisville Bride magazine.

The idea for a wedding show at The Palace came about as a result of the venue becoming proactive in seeking out a wedding business in the hopes couples would consider being married in the historic landmark. Thus, according to O’Bryan, who is also the director of sales and marketing for The Louisville Palace, the show had to stand out from the traditional fare, tapping into the sexier side of nuptials with the help of Armbrust and Murphy, who work together as Boudoir Louisville. The Palace Wedding Show will have over 40 vendors, with some vendors who wouldn’t normally have a place at the kids’ table of a wedding show reception display their wares and services for this eclectic event.

“We’re kinda billing this as an evening out more so than just come in and shuffle through a bunch of vendors,” added Armbrust, encouraging the brides and grooms to bring their friends to enjoy themselves at the bars while taking in live music by The Crashers or a film from Folklore Cinema. Not only this, but with five hours to get know the vendors in attendance, brides and grooms can be more selective in who they choose. As Murphy would state later in the interview, “it kills [her] when [her brides] choose people based on recommendations or that they think really have a great reputation, and [her brides] get screwed over,” making it important for guests at the show to have a chance to get to know who their possible wedding vendors are. The extended length of this show also allows for guests to head home, “take a shower,” then come out to make a night out of the event according to O’Bryan.

Regarding Armbrust’s and Murphy’s involvement in the show, their participation came as a result of their work shooting brides for their respective studios. “We kinda wanted to get involved and do something to kinda capitalize on that bridal market, and get all those people through the studio,” Armbrust said, “so when we met Sydney, we kinda pitched an idea and said, ‘Hey, let’s do a bridal show.’” O’Bryan, herself a wedding business veteran of over a decade, praised the duo for bringing a different energy to the table, noting that she never saw anyone pushing the envelope, “something sexy, a little gift for the husband-to-be, or something for [the brides].”

“Weddings are evolving,” Murphy said. “If you talk to your mom or your aunt or your grandma about how their weddings were, they’re a lot different from weddings from today,” explaining how personalization and outside-the-box thinking is more prevalent in modern nuptials, a theme that carries through to the Palace Wedding Show, whose tag is “not your mother’s wedding show… this is YOUR wedding show!” That said, all three producers encourage brides and grooms to bring their mothers, fathers, brothers, sisters, friends et al to have a good time at what O’Bryan hopes will be an annual tradition at the historic venue.