Louisville's new picture book [Visual Art]

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J.G.: How important is social media to you?
M.H.: Social media is super important. Kickstarter is how it all began and before the first issue even came out we had 300 Facebook followers. Now we have over 600. It’s crazy to me. We also have 400 Twitter followers. The buzz created from this is incredibly helpful. Because we’re sincere about what we’re doing people respect it and they want to tell people about it. I hope this is something that people like and support.

J.G.: Are you the one in charge or is this a collaborative effort?
M.H.: I may be the head organizer but everyone plays a lead role.  Everyone has input but I have the final say. There are story ideas that I’ve said “no” to because it doesn’t really fit our goals.

J.G.: Can other photographers apply?
M.H.: We accept outside photographers. There is an application process of looking at their portfolios and an ethical questionnaire to answer. We already have a trust amongst us now because we’re friends so it is a different process when it’s someone we don’t know.

J.G.: Who does the editing?
M.H.: The photographers edit the shots down and then I take a look and see if the shots are the best for the story. I ask the photographers, “Why is this photo so important to the story?” At the same time, we don’t want to misrepresent the story. We’ll look at the shots next to each other and think will the reader misunderstand the story? What if the reader never reads the text, what kind of assumptions will they come up with?

J.G.: Will it always be in black and white?
M.H.: Yes, more than likely.

J.G.: How do you choose the cover photo?
M.H.: We go through all the photos and pick which is the most visually appealing.

J.G.: How has your photojournalism experience helped?
M.H.: Almost all of us work for the Courier-Journal so we’re used to having the paper's name behind us. The contacts are set up, the story is set up and the people know we’re coming, but with this publication we have to step back to our college days of making cold calls. The Courier has given us the confidence to be able to do that. When you tell people that you’re doing this for a photo story you try to explain what a photo story is to them, but it’s when they see it (the publication) that they finally understand what you’re trying to do. I always say, “The pictures are going to do the talking.”

J.G.: What kind of camera do you use?
M.H.: I use a Nikon D200.
A.B.: I use a Canon 5D Mark II. A lot of people look at the camera I use and say, “I bet that takes great photos,” but it doesn’t matter what kind of camera you use, it’s about the composition. One story was shot completely on a point and shoot.

J.G.: What’s your favorite picture story in the second issue?
M.H.: My favorite story in the February issue is by Dana Rieber. Her story is about the Raptor Rehab. I like that it’s different. We normally shoot people and this is about birds. People didn’t even know we had owls in Louisville.

J.G.: How would you describe Louisville?
M.H.: It’s a little big city. We have major events and at the same time lots of hidden gems. The best way to learn about Louisville is to talk to the people and as photographers we’re not really talkers, so we're still learning how to do this.

Maggie Huber will be a presenter at the next Louisville Pecha Kucha Night, Metro Hall, 7 pm doors, 8 pm presentations. The second issue of THIS will be released the first weekend of February. Find THIS on Facebook.


THIS (Feb. issue)

photo: photographers Aaron Borton and Maggie Huber

About Julie Gross
I’m originally from Ohio, but have been a Louisvillian for half my life. I divide my time between hubby, 3 kids, too many pets, and the 930 Art Center. When I'm not, you'll find me running the trails in Cherokee or Jefferson Memorial Forest.
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