Midnights at the Baxter presents 'Repo Man'

Print
Midnights at the Baxter presents 'Repo Man'

My uncle was a repo man. It was his job to collect vehicles whose owners were delinquent on their payments. His “clients” didn't like him much. I'm sure he has lots of interesting and hilarious stories about this that I could share with you, but he lives in Reno and I don't really ever see him. There were a couple of movies in recent years with an interesting take on the idea of repossession. Repo: The Genetic Opera is a rock opera set in a dystopian future where those who fall behind on payments for organ transplants have said innards repossessed by Giles from Buffy the Vampire Slayer. (I wanted this film to be awesome – it was merely silly.) Similar to this, and released shortly after, is Repo Men, which is basically the same idea, without music, and starring Jude Law and Forest Whittaker. They are the repo men, which is problematic when one of them can't pay for his heart transplant and must go on the run.

But we are here to talk about the 1984 cult classic Repo Man, starring Emilio Estevez and Harry Dean Stanton. Estevez is Otto, a bored supermarket clerk with punkish tendencies. Stanton is Bud, a repo man who recruits Otto for the job after he gets fired from his supermarket job. What follows are all sorts of weird and wacky shenanigans, for, as Bud warns Otto, “The job of a repo man is always intense.”

Baxter Avenue Theater presents a midnight screening of Repo Man tomorrow, Saturday. Baxter Avenue Theater is located at 1250 Bardstown Road. Further theater information and advance ticket sales can be found at the Baxter Avenue Theater website.

Image: Internet Movie Database

About Allan Day
My "real" job is bartending, but I'm a writer and a filmmaker, owner of Monkey's Uncle Productions LLC. I am also a single father, avid reader of books, watcher of movies, and listener of music. My idols include Kurt Vonnegut, Charlie Chaplin, Charlie Kaufman, Lloyd Kaufman, Lars von Trier, Ingmar Bergman, Thom Yorke, Jonsi, Don DeLillo, and David Foster Wallace.
More articles from Allan Day