Midnights at the Baxter presents 'The Room'

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Midnights at the Baxter presents 'The Room'

We've done this one before – but that's ok. That was eight and a half months ago, and while I'm sure my myriad of regular readers are rolling their eyes at what is basically a rerun, I have doubtless accrued many more avid fans who have not yet read about the joys of this article's subject, which is: bad movies. I love them. I hate them. Since we last visited the subject, I have myself created a very amateur and somewhat lacking short film. I've been watching low-budget movies with a new eye. Many examples are complete crap, but they can still be inspiring. Take, for instance, Fungicide or Meat Market: movies which are poorly made, but the filmmakers believed in what they were doing. They may not have had the talent or the resources, but they wanted to make a movie, and, dammit, they made a movie! You can tell when a terrible movie has heart – and that is what really matters. And we hope they do better with their next effort.

(We will absolutely, under no circumstances, not be discussing the wretched and abominable Birdemic, about which I have many incendiary opinions, but which upset me enough to declare that I will no longer ever acknowledge its existence. So, you know, pretend this paragraph doesn't exist.)

So, what are we getting at here? Tommy Wiseau's The Room, of course! This modern classic of terrible cinema will be playing at midnight at Baxter Avenue Theaters tomorrow (Saturday). Wiseau writes, directs, and stars as Johnny, a happily married successful banker. His life is thrown into turmoil, however, when his fiancee seduces his best friend – which is just the beginning of his troubles, as all his friends begin to betray him in a variety of ways.

Baxter Avenue Theater is located at 1250 Bardstown Road. Further theater information and advance ticket sales can be found at the theater's website.

Image: Internet Movie Database

About Allan Day
My "real" job is bartending, but I'm a writer and a filmmaker, owner of Monkey's Uncle Productions LLC. I am also a single father, avid reader of books, watcher of movies, and listener of music. My idols include Kurt Vonnegut, Charlie Chaplin, Charlie Kaufman, Lloyd Kaufman, Lars von Trier, Ingmar Bergman, Thom Yorke, Jonsi, Don DeLillo, and David Foster Wallace.
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